Thursday, October 09, 2008

Today's Quote: Goodin on Grappling

Karate Thoughts Blog
In the context of self-defense, grappling essentially is seizing. We tend to think that such seizing is followed by a throw, but this is not necessarily so. In sports, such as wrestling, you typically have to pin your opponent. In Judo, you either have to execute a clean throw or pin your opponent.

But in self-defense, seizing can be the beginning of many things. You could seize and throw. You could seize and push or pull. You could seize and execute a locking technique. You could seize and choke. And, very importantly in Karate, you can do all or any of the above, plus you can seize and strike, poke, tear, rip, stomp, dislocate joints, break bones, poke vulnerable areas, etc. And you could always seize something... like the testicles. A handful of testicles will usually get an attacker's undivided attention (and there are other body parts you could seize with equal or even greater effect).

The point is that grappling -- seizing -- is not simply a matter of grabbing and throwing. In fact, in my experience, the strongest strikes are done when you have already seized and put your attacker into a weak position.
For example, if someone punches at you, you could block or avoid the punch and counter by punching him on the nose (just an example). That might work.

Charles C. Goodin, Grappling -- Not Just Throws

1 comment:

markstraining.com said...

So very true. Well put. Grappling for sport and grappling for the street can involve some major differences, which all should understand. I especially like this statement and believe it applies perfectly with hikite, "the strongest strikes are done when you have already seized and put your attacker into a weak position"