Tuesday, February 26, 2008

Today's Quote: MacYoung on Personal Safety

"There is no reason to live in fear of crime and violence. There is however reason to take reasonable precautions. And in doing so, you will have deterred most criminals from choosing you as their victim."
- Marc MacYoung and Dianna Gordon, Pyramid of Personal Safety

 

 

 

Reading reports in the media, I always try to make point of examining how a situation may have been avoided before it got to the point where a crime was committed, or a victim was assaulted, raped, or robbed. Young and Gordon explain their theory of personal protection, summarized using the example of a pyramid, with caution and common sense at the bottom of the pyramid, physical self-defense at the top.

The idea is that it's much easier (and healthier) to take reasonable precautions as opposed to fighting or killing your way out of a situation. Stories of women getting raped outside their apartments at 2 AM made me think, "Why the hell is she outside her apartment at 2 AM?!" Property is stolen many times by just being there - a vehicle left running in the driveway somehow turns up missing. Huh? A convenience store without a surveillance system or inadequate lighting. The examples of how we can avoid becoming victims are plentiful and, in retrospect, obvious. Again, the idea here is prevent being selected in the first place, if possible, then prepare yourself in every way possible if you do. Read up, then take action!

For more information:

TDA Crime Prevention
TDA Home Security
Charlotte Self Defense
Crime Information
Defend University
Dr Ruthless Melissa Soalt
No Nonsense Self Defense

2 comments:

Chris Marshall | Martial Development said...

I like Marc MacYoung's work too. The right way to stop a bullet is not to catch it in your teeth, as so many martial artists wish to do, but to prevent it from being fired at all.

Nathan Teodoro said...

Good one Chris. More time should be spent becoming personal protection specialists by just being "in the moment" as opposed to thinking about work, what's for dinner, etc., too.